How does the party with fewer assets protect themselves in a prenuptial agreement?

By Cynthia Ann Brassington
October 06, 2017
How does the party with fewer assets protect themselves in a prenuptial agreement?

The first step is to get a lawyer to ensure that you are being treated fairly in a prenuptial agreement. If a party does not have significant assets and they are marrying the person that does have significant assets, it's valuable for that party to have a prenuptial agreement so that he or she knows what would happen in the event of a divorce. Then they can make the decision as to whether they want to live with it.

We also use life insurance as an invaluable tool in a prenuptial agreement. If the financially empowered spouse has significant prenuptial assets that they want to leave to their children for example from their first marriage, a life insurance policy benefiting the less financially empowered spouse may be an option. But as I always say, every case is different.


New Jersey attorney Cynthia Ann Brassington is certified by the Supreme Court of New Jersey as a Matrimonial Law Attorney, and regularly helps people to resolve their divorce-related issues, from property division, to child support, and custody. To learn more about Cynthia and her practice visit www.LinwoodFamilyLaw.com.

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October 06, 2017
Categories:  Financial Issues|FAQs

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